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FIDE World Chess Championship: Anand - Topalov draw Game 3, Match remains all square

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The players returned from a day of rest, suddenly seeming to be far better prepared than they were in the initial two games. Topalov and Anand finally agreed to a draw after 46 moves that took just about four hours time.

Topalov jumped into the lead forcing Anand to resign early in the first game, before Anand returned the favour in Game 2. Game 3 saw a more sedate approach compared to the attack at the gates approach in the first two contests. The draw took longer than it would have under normal circumstances due to the confusion surrounding the rules of engagement.

Topalov has stated that he will neither offer nor accept a draw from Anand, as he chooses to follow the Sofia rules, wherein a draw is achieved through a repetition of moves or in consultation with the arbiter. In the end they repeated moves, before Topalov called in the arbiter to arrange for the draw. Neither player shook hands at the end of the game, in a clear sign of a deteriorating relationship.

Anand chose to use the Slav Defence, ensuring that he focused on building his position and biding his time for opportunities. At various times during the game, most prominently on the 20thmove Topalov tried to induce Anand into accepting a pawn and opening an opportunity for the Bulgarian. But Anand did not have to think too long before moving on with his position game, ignoring the pawn offer.

The only slip up of the game for Anand came on the 25th move, when he let Topalov advance his pawn. But Anand reacted quickly to defend strongly to mitigate any possible complication.

Reacting to a question from the press in Sofia on the situation at the 25th move, Anand had this to say -"At one moment the position was quite dangerous, but I think I defended well."

Topalov agreed: "I (believe) I had an advantage but I misplayed it and he was able to equalise."

Topalov is an attacking player. It is this style of his opponent that may be driving Anand to opt for an early exchange of queens, as he did in the second game. In game 3 the queens were exchanged on the 10th move.

The fourth game is on Wednesday, with Anand playing the white pieces, an advantage that he will look to capitalise upon to go ahead in the match.

Scores: Topalov 1.5 - 1.5 Anand

Moves: Access a visual representation of the entire match here.

Story so far: Game 1 & Game 2

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